Sunday, 6 November 2011

Restoration of Thorikon Theatre, Laurion, Attica


The ancient Theatre of Thorikos, at Lavrion, is probably the most ancient surviving theatre in Greece. It is dated between 525 and 480 B.C.

Its most apparent phase dates to 450 B.C., while a third phase, dated to 425 B.C., showed that certain additions were of great importance. It is obvious even today that, being one of the first to be built, it faced a number of problems that seem to have been solved in later theatres.

For example it did not have a drainage pipe for the koilon (called an euripos according to the director of restorations of the Central Archaeological Council, Athanasios Nakasis). During antiquity a hidden supporting wall supported the supporting wall of the koilon. The necessity for this extra support was due to the weight of the earth that was increaced because of inadequate drainage for the oblong orchestra. A second supporting wall was added in the '50ies for the same reason.

The direction of restoration and the 2nd Ephorate of antiquities of Attica decided to solve the problem, using thin metal rods, which will be invisible, as they will be planted in the ground.

They will be 12 cm thick and 38 of them will be placed along 24 meters, so as to carry the weight, offerig a solution to the problem.

Adapted from Ethnos.gr, 06.11.2011

Saturday, 8 October 2011

An Important Case of Antiquities Smuggling (Thessalonike, Greece)

by Kostas Onisenko

Ancient objects similar to those that were confiscated by the Department of Illegal Antiquities Trade of the Greek Police last Thursday will be admired by visitors of the large exhibition at the Louvre in Paris "Ancient Macedonia - The Kingdom of Alexander the Great". The antiquities that were located by the police are similar to those that have been discovered in various localities of Central Macedonia, such as Sindos, Archondiko of Pella and elsewhere. "It is certain that these come from an illegal dig, certainly in Central Macedonia" commented a source in the Ministry of Culture. They total 70 objects of great archaeological importance, probably of the 6th century BC. The police handed over to archaeologists four helmets, golden masks, golden mouth-pieces, clay and metal vessels, pieces of an iron sword, various gold pieces and more. The archaeologists have not et determined their exact provenance.

The antiquities were handed over to the Archaeological Museum on the day that they wer e confiscated, in the presence of the Minister of Culture, P. Geroulanos, and the heads of Greek Police.

A source from the Ministry of Citizen Protection speaking to "Kathimerini" spoke of the great interest and the dimensions that this operations took on, and are related not only to the importance of the finding and saving such an important archaeological treasure: 'The geographic provenance of the objects and the fact that they seem to be related to the culture of Alexander the Great's Macedonia is of special importance, as it was imperative that they were not exported. In that case it would have been possible that they be "rediscovered" in an official "excavation" of one of our neighbouring countries. We have indications that such "discoveries of archaeological treasures" had in fact earlier been sold by illegal antiquity merchants from Greece. However this is something extremely difficult to prove", according to the same source.
The Greek Prime Minister Georgos Papandreou and the Minister of Culture Pavlos Geroulanos examine the antiquities.

"People of the Night"

According to information it was about three months ago that the police received the first information pertaining to the case. They contacted the illegal antiquities merchants in the guise of potential buyers and agreed to "buy" the treasure for the sum of 10 mil. euros. During the deal two people were arrested and two more are now wanted. According to police sources the were "people of the night" (mafia).

Source: Kathimerini, 08.10.2011


Supplementary information, taken from the article by
Aggeliki Kopi, Ta Nea.

It appears that the finds come from four or maybe five separate graves. Given that there are four helmets and some objects related to a woman's burial there must be at least five separate graves. It appears that they come from a hitherto unknown burial site.

The objects include: Four helmets, two golden masks with the features of the dead person, gold mouth-pieces, gold plates and jewellery that was attached to the clothes (tainies, circular pieces with the Macedonian star and more), gold rings, pins, and a small silver spoon are amongst the most important of the 70 antiquities recovered. We must also mention a miniature glass amphora with beautiful colours and designs, a phiale bearing the well known ray-decoration (star), an exceptional oinochoe, whose handle ends near the lip in the form of three lion heads, silver vessels, the upper part of a large bronze oinochoe, small clay figurines and a large selection of gold leaf decorated with Macedonian motifs.


According to the report of Aggeliaforos, 25.10.2011 one of those accused in this case disclosed information about the whereabouts of the unknown cemetery: it is said to be located in the larger area of Gerakarou. The archeologists where guided to the spot by the accused, but no announcement has yet officially been made.

Aggeliki Kopi, Ta Nea, 08.10.2011

See also:

Sunday, 25 September 2011

Relations militaires, commerciales et culturelles dans les Balkans de l'époque classique à la période byzantine

Symposium International. Le Livre. La Roumanie. L'Europe.
Section 4C: Relations militaires, commerciales et culturelles dans les Balkans de l'époque classique à la période byzantine. Sinaia, 20-23 September 2011.

The International Symposium entitled "Le Livre. La Roumanie. L'Europe." that took place in the picturesque town of Sinaia has just ended.

It may be surprising that this would be mentioned on this site, if it were not for the Section 4C, which focused on "Military, commercial and cultural relations in the Balkans from the classical to the Byzantine period". Here a number of interesting papers by young and established academics were presented and ideas exchanged.

The full program can be found here:

http://simpozion2011.bibliotecametropolitana.ro/page-detail-fr.aspx?cId=86

accompanied by abstracts. Photos and videos are also available, and the acts will be ready in time for next year's congress!

Thursday, 15 September 2011

Mycenean Cemetery reveals itself!




A Mycenaean cemetery of the 14th c. B.C. revealed itself after a heavy rainfall in the Peloponnese, 10 km NW of Leonidion, near the village of Vaskina (Βασκίνα). It contained five graves.

When the archaeologists of the 38th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities proceeded with an excavation of the site they found the five cist-shaped graves, in which more than one dead had been buried.

According to a declaration made by the head of the Ephorate, mrs Karapanagiotou, the locals discovered the outlines of the graves that had been uncovered by the rain and immediately informed the Archaeological service.

Ceramic banqueting vessels of the kind usually found in graves, stone weaving weights and a bronze pin were among the offerings that accompanied the dead.

However a cemetery signifies a settlement, which has yet to be discovered, but was obviously one of the many that flourished in the Peloponnese during the Mycenaean period.




Sources:

Saturday, 6 August 2011

Two men arrested for smuggling in Larissa, Greece.

Two men were arrested in Larissa for smuggling antiquities. The 70-year old owner of an enterprise specialised in the construction of metallic builidngs and a 58-year old head-worker in the same buissness, situated on the 60th km of the Larissa-Kozani highway were arrested, charged with breaking the law on protection of antiquities.

While searching the building police found and confiscated a portion of a grave stele, part of an ionian capital, part of a demi-column, a small corinthian capital, all dating to the 4th-4rd centuries, and three portions of smoking pipes of the othoman period.

Source: Ethnos, 05.08.2011.

The Tomb of Aeneia (Nea Michaniona, Thessalonike, Macedonia, Greece)

The Tomb of Aeneia
By Vicky Charisopoulou
Source: Ta Nea, 05.08.2011

In the centre of the great hall of the permanent exhibitions of the Archaeological Musem of Thessalonike an entire tomb has been placed. It is well worth the effort to climb the two steps to
the elevated floor that surrounds it to look into its interior, hidden from view for 2300 years. The tomb was removed in its entirety during the excavations of the toumba on the south shores of the peninsula of Megalo Emvolo or Karabournou, to the NW of modern Nea Michaniona of Thessalonike. The area has been identified based on information given by Herodotus and Livy as the ancient city of Aeneia. The poros cist grave (named by archaeologists "of Aeneia") was found intact. Its interior is painted, its walls covered with murals of excellent quality (a multy-colour decoration band running along the four sides with plants, flowers, doves, ribbons) and personal items of the young woman were found inside. The burial is dated to 250-325 B.C.

The your aristocrat (judging by the finds) rested for 2300 years accompanied by her entire boudoir. The visitor can immerse himself into the exploration of the symbols that decorate the multy-coloured decoration that runs around the entire tomb. The burial symbols - doves, pine-combs and flowers - and the objects of everyday life (crown, ribbons, bust of a woman, case for toiletry goods) provide an excellent ensemble for painting of the 4th century B.C., one of the earliest in Macedonia. The are indicative of the luxurious life style and of the religious beliefs of the young aristocrat.

The town of Aeneia (modern Nea Michaniona) was named after its founder Aeneas, the legendary hero of Troy, son of the goddess Aphrodite and of Anchises. When, after the ten-year siege Troy was conquered by the Greeks, Aeneas smuggled his old father out of the city, carrying his on his shoulders. His left his home followed by his wife Creousa (daughter of the king of Troy Priam and of Hecuba) and their children, including his daughter Anthemone, after whom the town of Anthemous (Anthemusias) was named.

The final destination of the journey was Latium, in modern Italy, but Aeneas was forced to stop on modern Megalo Karabourbnou. Here, having buried his father who did not survive the journey, he built the city of Aeneia. Since then what is now know as Megalo Karanournou (t.n.: Karabournou is its Turkish name) was named Aeneia Akra and Ainaion Akroterion (t.n. Peninsula of Aenea).

Aeneas continued his journey to Italy, but his wife Creousa with their son Askanius and their daughters remained in the newly-founded city, where she reigned until her death.

Saturday, 30 July 2011

Oxyrhynchus Papyri Online



Oxyrhynchus Papyri Online

From Eleutherotypia, 29.07.2011.

The important archaeological find of the Papyri of Oxyrynchus (500 B.C.-1000 A.D.) has been known since the beginning of the last century.

Part of it has been kept since its discovery in Oxford, where attempts to decode the material continue. The latest discovery, according to the Times, is an unknown Gospel (3rd cent.) which recounts cases of exorcisms performed by Christ. The decoding of this document has not been completed, nor has that of many thousand other papyri, which include texts of great importance (including works of Aristotle, Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylus, Archilochus, Saphfo and others). In order to decode this cast material the researchers in Oxford are not enough. For this reason they have chosen to use technology, asking the help of surfers worldwide: they have uploaded scanned versions of 200,000 pieces of papyri to the site www.ancientlives.org and, using specialised software they ask visitors to identify letters, allowing for the reading of each scrap of papyrus!

A.M. Note:

The whole process is easy to understand and fun! A useful way to brush up your palaeographical skills!!

Tuesday, 26 July 2011

Weary Hercules returns from Boston

Weary Herakles bust to be returned by US to Turkey


From BBC News, 22.07.2011

Weary Herakles. Courtesy of the Muesum of Fine Arts, Boston. Link


The two halves of the statue (top half in Boston MOFA, lower half in Antalya museum)



The stunning piece portrays the demigod Hercules

The top half of the Weary Herakles statue, which was bought by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in 1982, is to be returned to its native Turkey.

After an ongoing dispute, the MFA will reunite the bust with its lower half at the Antalya Museum later this year.

The announcement is seen as a victory for Turkey which is trying to retrieve artefacts it believes have been looted throughout the years.

It is thought the full statue will return to Boston on a short-term loan.

The top half of the sculpture of weary demigod Hercules was purchased in 1981 from a German dealer, by the MFA and late New York art collecter Leon Levy.

A year later, it was displayed at the US museum before being put into storage in 2007.

Turkish archaeologists were convinced the bust had been looted and taken from the country. At the same time, the lower half of the statue was discovered in 1980 at Perge in southern Turkey.

The MFA always denied that was the case, insisting the bust could have been found "any time since the Italian Renaissance".

Speaking to the Times newspaper, Katherine Getchell from the Boston Museum, said: "It's only in the last couple of years that they've presented us with photos and other evidence of looting from that site."

This is the latest victory for Turkey's campaign to track down lost antiquity.

In May, the Pergamon Museum in Germany agreed to return a Hittite sphinx after the Turkish Culture Minister threatened to ban German archaeologists from digs in the country.

Ertugrul Gunay told the Times that the country plans to "fight in the same way for all our other artefacts".




........................................................................

A.M. Note

Despite the declaration that "It's only in the last couple of years that they've presented us with photos and other evidence of looting from that site", the video (see above) shows that casts of the two pieces had been fitted together. The test appears to have taken place in September 1992 (see the Boston Globe article). After this test - which proved beyond doubt the origin of the statue, the museum decided to switch its defence, arguing that the date of exportation could have been prior to 1906, as Turkish law protects only artefacts smuggled out after that date.

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See also:

Monday, 25 July 2011

Revue Archéologique

Revue Archéologique

Nouvelle Série

7 (1866), 13 (Jan.-Jun.) (Galica)
7 (1866), 14 (Jun.-Dec.) (Gallica)
8 (1867), 15 (Jan.-Jun.) (Gallica)
8 (1867), 16 (Jun.-Dec.) (Gallica)

16 (1875), 29 (Jan.-Juin) (I.A.)
16 (1875), 30 (Juil.-Dec.) (I.A.)

Sunday, 24 July 2011

Athens & Epidaurus Festival

Athens & Epidaurus Festival

The larger modern Greek cities often strike the arriving visitor as an inhuman monstrosities, sweltering masses of ugliness and chaos. Yet, as is sometimes the case, first impressions can be mistaken, and islands of beauty can be discovered by the discerning eye, carefully hidden from those too sloth to seek them.

This is inevitably the case of Athens, whose millennia of history guarantee that there are hidden treasures to satisfy all.

Yet today I shall speak of a thing of beauty that should not be considered a secret or a mystery, as it is an official festival of the Greek state, and thus should be widely publicised. Indeed for many locals it is an event eagerly awaited each year, yet few foreigners ever get to hear about it.

I refer to the Athens & Epidaurus Festival, which takes place each year from July to early September. Its programme includes performances of music, dance, theatre and exhibitions of visual arts, with the participants often being the most illustrious companies from around the world.

The Herodus Atticus Odeon at the foot of the Acropolis.

And yet it is not the performers - who usually range from excellent to superb - that make this festival unique. It is the venues that make the experience unique both for those on the stage as for those watching. My first experience of this was at the age of four, when I was taken to the Ancient Odeon of Herodus Atticus at the foot of the Acropolis, to listen to a magnificent Carmina Burana. Despite my age and the late hour at which the performance ended I was so enchanted that I wanted to stay on after its ending, not wishing to leave the magic which I felt all around me...

The Ancient Theatre of Epidaurus

Since then I have eagerly gone to performances both in the Herodus Atticus Odeon -especially for classical music - and the Ancient Theatre of Epidaurus, where modern productions of both ancient dramas and modern theatre in a truly unique setting, allow for the added experience of feeling how the ancients must have experienced theatre.

Maybe it is because I am not going to Greece this summer that I wanted to share this, hoping for a dreamy echo of some mystical magic...

If you want to fit in a performance or two while in Greece, the best place to start is the official site of the festival with information on venues and the full programme and offers the possibility to buy tickets online. Although many people do not respect this, it should be remembered that the two sites mentioned are archaeological sites and should be respected as such. Please do not litter and do not wear high heals!

Friday, 22 July 2011

A Coin Hoard from Abdera returned to Greece

Return of a Coin Hoard to Greece
Source: Eleutherotypia, 21.07.2011.
By N. Kontrarou-Rassia

A rich American collector bought from a coin auction in New York in 2000 an Archaïc hoard of coins from ancient Abdera.

The hoard bought by 54-year old Jonathan Kagan was made up of 22 silver coins, which he delivered last year in September to the Consulate of Greece in New York, having previously studies them and published his conclusions in a volume dedicated to the great American numismatist John H. Kroll.

His desire was that the hoard enrich the collection of the Numismatic Museum of Athens, in honour of the professor of the University of Texas J. H. Kroll, whose work in a landmark in the study of the coinage of Athens.

How much did the acquisition cost?

The hoard is made up of three didrachms, a drachm, a hemidrachm, two obols and fifteen hemiobols. The coins first appeared in commerce in London in 2000 and were divided. Some appeared in auction catalogues. Greece did not claim them, evidently because it had no evidence of illegal exportation from the country.

Mr Kagan is a director of a company that is active in hi-tech products in New York; he has a degree from Harvard and completed his post-graduate studies in Oxford. He obtained the greater part of the hoard in 2000. He is a collector himself, and in the past has offered pieces from his collection to various American museums. He admires ancient art and his wife is Ute Wartenberg-Kagan, head of the American Numismatic Society, prolific writer on ancient Greek numismatics.


Octadrachm (28,12 gr, 28 mm) of Abdera (c. 500-475 B.C.?). CNG eAuction 256 (25.05.2011), 4. NOT part of the hoard.

How much did the acquisition of the 22 rare coins of Abdera cost? "I do not know. But whether he bought them for a cent or for five millions, what is important is the gesture, which shows that the world is now sensitive and responds to our calls for the return of antiquities", Despoina Evgenidou, director of the Numismatic Museum of Athens told us yesterday. She is already working on the exhibition of the hoard, which will be ready during the second half of November.

The scientific value of the coins is great. They prove that in this early time, the 6th century B.C., people used coins and, what is more, small silver fractions of the drachma, which a few years later were replaced by bronze coins. These coins were not destined to pay taxes or to buy grain from other regions. They were the means to cover everyday needs (food, household objects). "The larger exchanges, as the payment of taxes and long-distance commerce, where largely covered by the silver series, meaning the octadrachms and the tetradrachms", claims the director of the Numismatic Museum. The existence of this treasure shows that moneyed societies existed in very early times. It also tells us what the coinage of Abdera at the end of the 6th century was.

Apollo and Gryffin

"It is a very important donation, because not only does it enrich the numismatic series of Abdera that we have in the Numismatic Museum, but it adds to a very important section of our collections, that of coin hoards", underlines mrs Evgenidou.

Abdera was founded, according to myth, by Hercules, to honour the memory of his comrade Abderus, who had been killed by the mares of Diomedes. The first founder was the Klazomenian Timesios in 654 B.C. The city was refounded in 545 B.C., when migrants from the ionian town of Teos arrived, escaping enslavement by the Persians. The coins of the new inhabitants were similar to those of their old home. On the reverse they bore the head of Apollo and on the obverse a Griffin, the monster of myth that was considered to guard gold and silver mines. This is the type to be found on the coins offered by mr Kagan. The most important ones are those almost invisible to the eye: the small silver fractions that circulated for a few years before being replaced by larger bronze coins.

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A.M. Notes
:

1. The image that illustrates the original article (not reproduced here) has nothing to do with the hoard under discussion. It is an image from the Hoard Northern Syria, Manbij (?), 2010 (see here), comprised of tertradrachms and drachms of Philip II and Alexander III.
2. The complete title of the publication mentioned is: Jonathan H. Kagan, "Small Coinage and the Beginning of Coinage at Abdera", Agoranomia: Studies in Money and Exchange presented to John H. Kroll, New York 2006, 49-59.
3. The complete composition, as presented by Kagan: 5 Didrachms, 2 Drachms, 2 Hemidrachms (first known), 2 Obols, 18 Hemiobols. Total 29.
4. The early coins of Abdera did not have the Apollo type. They bore the Griffin on the obverse and an incuse square on the reverse (see photo, above). These are the types that the coins from this hoard bore.
5. For the coinage of Abdera see: J.M.F. May, The Coinage of Abdera, London 1966.

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On the same subject:

Bulgaria. 17. Plovdiv.

Bulgaria. 17. Plovdiv.

1. Kozi Gramadi. Double axe, 21.07.2011.

Double axe found in Bugaria

A double axe of the ancient Thracians was discovered in Bulgaria.

It is 22 cm long and was found near the hill called Kozi Gramadi.

From: To Vima, 15.07.2001.

A ceremonial double axe, dated to c. 600 B.C. was brought to light by archaeologists in Bulgaria during excavations carried out in the palace of the rulers of the Kingdom of the Odryses, who were the strongest tribe of ancient Thrace. The iron axe, 22 cm long was discovered near the main gate of the fortified living place of the kings - today's hill of Kozi Gramandi - and, although it is the second that comes to light in an archaeological site of the region, it is considered an especially important discovery, as archaeologists are still trying to understand its exact use.

The double axe found in the digs of Kozi Gramadi.

"The Lavrys, as it was called by the Greeks, was used more for certain ceremonies and less for military purposes or as a household item", explains the head of the dig Ivan Kristoff. Another hypothesis, based on representations in tombs of ancient Macedonia and of the tomb discovered in the Haskovo region, is that the double axe was used in the royal hunt.


Didrachme of Pixodaros (340-334 B.C.), Carian Satrap, bearing the head of Apollo on the obverse and Zeus Labrandos standing r. on the reverse. Künker 136 (10.03.2008), 653.

"If not by the ruler himself, maybe by his comrades", says the archaeologists. "In this sense, the discovery of the iron weapon in the ancient Thracian palace is not a coincidence", he adds. He explains that the lavrys in ancient Greek mythology was the double axe of Zeus Labrandos, who was worshiped in Labranda of Karia, and is represented standing and holding a lavrys over his right shoulder.


Coin of Amadokos I (400-386 B.C.) showing a horse on the obverse and a double axe surrounded by the inscription AMA[Δ]OKO. G. Hirsch 271 (17.02.2011), lot 1801.

It must be noted that the first representations of a lavrys are dated to the 2nd millennium B.C., while in ancient Thrace the oldest are dated to the Bronze Age. In the Balkan region it appears for the first time as a royal symbol on the bronze coins of the king of the Odryses Amadokos at the end of the 5th century B.C. The new find will be added to the exhibition of the National Historic Museum of Bulgaria.
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Note of A.M.: It must be noted that the double axe, the lavrys, was a central symbol of the Minoan civilisation on the island of Crete. This, then, is the oldest use of the symbol in the Balkan region, unless the term is used to the exclusion of what is today Greece.

Note 2 of A.M.: The double axe is found on coins of the island of Tenedos (Turkish: Bozcaada), in the entrance to the Dardanelles, dated to 450/387 B.C.

Coin of Tenedos (450/387). 0,48 g. It bears an ianomorphus head (female l., male r.) on the obverse and a double axe with the letters T-E on either side on the reverse. The heads on the obverse might be those of Tenes and his sister Hemithea. Künker 136 (10.03.2008), 628.

The presence of the double-axe is interpreted either as related to local myths of the island related to its eponymous hero Tenes, or a symbol of Dionysus. This last interpretation is interesting, as the presence of the lavrys on the coins of the Thracian-Skythian ruler Amadokos I and his successors is also likely to be related to the worship of Dionysus, who is known to have held special importance in the religious practices of the area (see for example the myth of King Lycourgos of Thrace). It is thought that the worship of this god was transmitted to Greece from the Thracian tribes.

Wednesday, 20 July 2011

10. South Aegean. 18. Antiparos

Despotikon.

Despotiko: The Island of the Kouroi

Despotiko: The Island of the Kouroi

From: To Vima, 18.07.2011, by Maria Thermou.



Kouroi, made of the famous Parian marble are being discovered on Despotikon, the little island near Antiparos, by archaeologist Yannos Kourayos, who has been excavating a large temple of the Archaic Period dedicated to Apollo since 2001.



The body of a Kouros - from the neck to the waist - that had been placed face down on the lintel of a door, used to support the lintel, and at a different part of the excavation two large sections of legs - thigh and heel - of another statue, also a Kouros, preserved in excellent condition was the impressive find of this year, but not the only one. It is interesting that the body is joined to the lower part of a Kouros that had been discovered built into the wall of a building of the sanctuary in 2005. It is possible, according to Mr. Kourayos, that the head of a Kouros found last year belongs to the same statue!


In order to better understand this "collection" of sculpture that is coming to light on Despotikon, it must be noted that until now more than 60 parts of sculptures have been discovered, including five heads of Kouroi and one smaller one that belongs to a Kore, more than ten bodies of various dimentions and about 30 bases for offerings (Kouroi or votive columns).

The body discovered this year had been cut from the rest of the statue, it had been placed in the ground upside-down and two joint-holes filled with lead had been made to support the doors axle. It had been surrounded by marble blocks to give it better stability and the upper part had been flattened so that the plaque of the lintel could better lie on it.



But the most important element is elsewhere: despite the flattening of the surface, traces of the hand bend and placed on the breast are discernible. As mr. Kourayos says: "This type of Kouros is only encountered in Parian workshops of the end of the 6th century B.C., while generally the hand held bent on the breast is, as we all know, a characteristic of archaic Kores". It must be noted that only two other statues with this trait are know, the Kouros of the Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhague and one other half-finished statue, in the Museum of Paros, found in the stone quarries of the island.

The building in which the body was discovered is small, being of the shape of a Naos with a prodomos, cella and adyton, located on the North-Eastern side of the sanctuary. "It appears that it was built in the late Archaic Period, after the violent destruction of the archaic Kouroi", says mr Kouragios.

But why the destruction? As mr Kourayos explains: "I believe that it might be connected to the war between Athens and Paros, when Miltiades was sent to punish the island because it sided with the Persians during the Persian Wars. That was when the statues were destroyed and were reused as construction material".


Another interesting point of this year's excavation was the discovery of a stylobate for a colonnade that was constructed around 500 B.C. with seven columns of a height of 3.80 m. In the foundations of the stylobate parts of the left foot of an archaic Kouros of natural size and of excellent style, which were joined with a portion of a thigh of a sculpture found in 2005. Next to these the base on which a smaller Kouros had stood, on which three toes of its right foot are preserved.



A square, marble well of religious character - it was where the libations were made - dated to the early Archaic Period was discovered under the later plaque-covered floor of the eating area of the sanctuary. Six different construction phases were discerned in the North gate of the sanctuary, considered to be its original entry. A mass of ceramic dated from the Geometric to the Archaic period has also been discovered, confirming that the sanctuary was already active in the Geometric period.

Ancient Prespesinthos, as Despotiko was called according to the testimony of Strabo and Pliny, played an important role in the Aegean. In antiquity in was attached to an (even smaller) island, Tsimintiri - where the archaeological finds extend -, it was home to an important sanctuary. Its position was strategic, it had a well protected port, a view to Sifnos to the west and Antiparos to the East, and was covered in plants.

Pieces of ceramics found on the island with the inscriptions "ΑΠΟΛΛ", "ΑΡΤΗΜΕ" or "ΑΡΧΗΜΕ" confirm the cult of Apollo and Artemis (sanctuaries dedicated to Apollo existed on 22 other islands). Pilgims bearing offerings arrived here: statuettes and objects of all sorts have been discovered: bronze and ivory buckles, gold, glass or stone beads, seal stones, statuettes of faïence, alabstra and Corinthian aryballoi, an ostrich egg, knives, swords, loom weights, agricultural tools and everyday vases. A special find made a few years ago was the discovery of the statuette of a female divinity of daedalic style (680-660 B.C.), considered to have been the cult statue of the sanctuary.

The excavation is carried out by the 21st Ephorate of Antiquities, under the direction of mr Kourayos, with the participation of many archaeologists, members of the scientific team: Kornelia Ntaifa, Spyros Petropoulos, Thanasis Garonis, as well as students from the University of Perugia. The study of the architectural material is been carried out for the second year, including the material from the twelve buildings, by the architect and Professor of the University of Munich, Dr And Onesorg and Dr. Katerina Papagianni. The I. Latsis Foundation and the A.P. Kanelopoulos Foundation were the sponsors of the excavation.

See also:

Naville, Ars Classica

Naville, Ars Classica

1 (04.04.1921 - Pozzi) (A.M.)
2
3
4
5 (18.06.1923)
6 (28.01.1924 - Bement)
7
8
9
10 (15.06.1925)
11
12
13
14 (02.07.1929 - Spencer-Churchill)
15
16 (03.07.1933)

Tuesday, 19 July 2011

Eqypt's Antiquities Boss Is Sacked

Eqypt's Antiquities Boss Is Sacked

on 18 July 2011, 3:29 PM

From: Science Insider, 18.07.2011




After nearly a decade as chief of Egypt's antiquities, Zahi Hawass is now out of a job.

The 64-year-old archaeologist was fired yesterday by Prime Minister Essam Sharaf as part of a wider shakeup of his cabinet. Protestors at Cairo's Tahrir Square had been calling for his ouster as minister of antiquities for months. "All the devils united against me," Hawass told Science Insider.

The country's most prominent figure in archaeology, Hawass was instrumental in sending large blockbuster exhibits abroad, creating a host of new museums and secure storerooms, and pressuring foreign excavators to publish their finds more quickly. But he was also criticized for his portrayal on American television of archaeology as treasure hunting, excoriated for his dictatorial management style, and accused of shoddy research in carrying out his own digs. Sharaf is said to have appointed Abdel-Fattah El-Banna as Hawass' replacement, but there are reports that protestors have rejected that nomination, and that Sharaf might reverse his decision and name someone else.

El-Banna is an engineer and stone specialist at Cairo University with experience in restoring ancient buildings. He has been an outspoken critic of Hawass in recent months, accusing him of being involved in the illegal antiquities trade, a charge that Hawass denies.

Egyptian critics say they are delighted by the departure of Hawass, who became a minister in January when the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), the organization he has led since 2002, was given Cabinet status. "Finally we got rid of him," says Amany Taha, a Cairo tour guide active in the protests.

But some foreign archaeologists say they will be sorry to lose Hawass, who has been a dynamic if controversial leader of the country's ancient monuments. "In the ensuing free-for-all, now that he is gone, I beg you to remember all the good that Zahi did for Egypt and Egyptian antiquities in his term as SCA," says W. Raymond Johnson, an archaeologist of the University of Chicago in Illinois who works at Luxor. "It's easy to condemn, much harder to give credit for what is due."

Hawass resigned in March to protest the looting of sites, but was recalled to help bring tourists back to Egypt. For now, Hawass says, "I will rest."

Zahi Hawass: the 'Real Indiana Jones'

Zahi Hawass was the self-styled real Indiana Jones, calling himself the keeper of Egypt's heritage.

From: The Telegraph, 18.07.2011

Mr Hawass, the public face of the pyramids, was head of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities for 10 years, and before that in charge of the Pyramids and Sphinx on the Giza plateau outside Cairo.

He staged regular press conferences unveiling new discoveries from the time of the pharaohs. He was made minister of antiquities in one of Hosni Mubarak's last acts as president.

Dr Hawass was popular among journalists, visitors and for a time Egyptians themselves for his flamboyant style and unchallenged commitment to promote Egypt's treasures and to use them to attract tourists.

He also led populist campaigns to return Egypt's heritage from museums abroad, most notably the Rosetta Stone from the British Museum.

However, local archaeologists accused him of stealing credit for their achievements, and "recycling" discoveries for publicity.

More seriously, as the Egyptian revolution unfolded, his finances, friendship with Mr Mubarak's wife, Suzanne, and management of resources came into question.

He was revealed to receive a regular income from the National Geographic channel, and was put on trial over the contract under which a company which marketed a "souvenir Hawass clothing line", including copies of the trademark hat, was awarded the rights to run the souvenir shop in the National Museum in Cairo.

He claimed that proceeds from the hats went to children's charities, of which Mrs Mubarak was patron.


Memorandum against Illegal Commerce of Antiquities



Memorandum against Illegal Commerce of Antiquities

Foteine Mparka, Eleutherotypia, 18.07.2011

Finally a memorandum that protects us (t.n.: the reference is to the economic memorandum). Since yesterday afternoon Greece has a strong ally in the battle against illegal exportation of its antiquities.

The American Foreign Minister and her Greek counterpart Stavros Lambinides, sign the memorandum in the Parthenon room.

For almost 10 years high ranking officials from the Greek ministry of Culture tried insistently to convince the United States to sign a Memorandum of Understanding for the limiting of importation of cultural goods of greek origin.

Yesterday afternoon , in the Parthenon room of the new Museum of Acropolis, the foreign affairs minister, Hillary Clinton, signed the text with her Greek counterpart, Stavros Lambrinides; they even went a step further. It is the most extensive text of collaboration that the USA has signed with another country and includes works of art dated from the Upper Palaiolothic (c. 20000 B.C.) to the end of the Byzantine period (15th c. A.D.).

Legal documentation

But what does this collaboration between the two countries mean? No object unearthed in Greece will be imported to the US unless accompanied by relevant legal documentation of origin. This makes illegal commerce of greek antiquities more difficult, but also makes the procedure of return of antiquities to the country. Will the interstate agreement have retroactive character? What shall be the fate of antiquities that have already been illegally exported to the US? Before examining the actual text, no conclusions can be drawn.

Whatever the case it will by activated immediately. The next move of the ministry of Culture will be to send the catalogue of categories of antiquities (analytically described) that has already been compiled, so that it be published in the Federal Protocol of the US, so as to block their importation to the country.

Satisfaction was apparent yesterday on the faces of the officials of the Ministry of Culture. The effort had started during the term of Evangellos Venizelos as Minister in 2002. It was then that a special scientific committee to prepare the dossier. The procedure entered its final phase during this last year, when a group of Greek specialists was invited by the special committee of the US State Department in Washington to support the Greek request. Before sending its official request, the Ministry of Culture compiled a dossier that showed how the cultural heritage of the country was in danger from illegal digs and commerce. The General Secretary of the Ministry, then as today, was Lina Mendoni, who was present at the signing ceremony, as was the current Minister of Culture, Pavlos Geroulanos.

"This agreement that we are signing today will protect Greece’s culturally significant objects even further from looting and sale on the international market... We know from experience that measures like this work. This will be our 15th cultural property agreement. And in countries from Cambodia to Cyprus, we have seen real results.", underlined Hillary Clinton during her short speech.

Profitable Business

The commerce of Greek antiquities in the US continues to be an especially lucrative business, with a turnover of millions of dollars. For example, in only the six months of 2010 Sotheby's and Christies of New York, auctioned more vases that the total of the years 2005, 2006 and 2009. What is more, Internet's ebay has helped create a rapidly developing uncontrolled commerce.

The Memorandum of Understanding, know by its initials MOU (Memorandum of Understanding), was instituted in 1983 by the American Congress. The central part of each memorandum is the interdiction of importation of antiquities without proper documentation. In order to sign and apply the Memorandum, a Committee was formed
, called the Cultural Property Advisory Committee (CPAC).

See also:

State Department Page on Agreements
US-Cyprus Memorandum
US-Italy Memorandum

Sunday, 17 July 2011

Antiquities smuggler arrested (Kastoria & Florina, Greece)

17.07.2011: Antiquities smuggler arrested

ANA-MPA/A 48-year-old man from Florina, northwestern Greece was arrested on Thursday charged with antiquity smuggling.

The suspect, while driving his car near Vassiliada village in Kastoria prefecture, was stopped by a police roadblock. A search of his car and later of his house in Florina revealed a large number of Roman and Byzantine era coins, other antiquities and photos believed to indicate locations where antiquities are buried.

Specifically, police found and confiscated 81 ancient coins, two marble statues from the Hellenistic period, the head from a female statuette, two copper rings, a lecythus, a medal, six clay seals, four copper brooches, two metal detectors, one perfume container, two USB flash drives and eight photographs of probable sites of antiquities.


From ana-mpa

Friday, 15 July 2011

Klio, Beiträge zur alten Geschichte

Klio, Beiträge zur alten Geschichte

1 (1901) (Google*)(Google*) (I.A.)
1 (1902) (Google*)
2 (1902) (Google*)
3 (1903) (Google*) (I.A.)
4 (1904) (Google*) (I.A.)
5 (1905) (Google*) (Google*) (I.A.)
6 (1906) (Google*) (I.A.)
7 (1907) (Google*) (I.A.) (I.A.)
8 (1908) (Google*) (Google*) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)

Praktika tes en Athinais Arxhaiologikes Hetaireias

Praktika tes en Athinais Arxhaiologikes Hetaireias - Πρακτικά της εν Αθήναις Αρχαιολογικής Εταιρείας.

[HEIDELBERG]

Περίοδος πρώτη (Prakt 1-13)
  • Tόμος 1, 1837*
  • Tόμος 2, 1838*
  • Tόμος 3, 1837/40*
  • Tόμος 4, 1839/40*
  • Tόμος 5, 1840/41*
  • Tόμος 6, 1841/42*
  • Tόμος 7, 1842/43
  • Tόμος 8, 1843/44*
  • Tόμος 9, 1844/45*
  • Tόμος 10, 1845/46*
  • Tόμος 11, 1846/47*
  • Tόμος 1-11, 1837-1846/47 (2η έκ.)*
  • Tόμος 12, 1847/48
  • Tόμος 13, 1848/49 (Google*)
• Περίοδος δεύτερη (Prakt 14-25)
  • Tόμος 14, 1858/59
  • Tόμος 15, 1859/60
  • Tόμος 16, 1860/61
  • Tόμος 17, 1861/62
  • Tόμος 18, 1862/63
  • Tόμος 19, 1863/64*
  • Tόμος 20, 1864/65*
  • Tόμος 21, 1865/66
  • Tόμος 22, 1866/67*
  • Tόμος 23, 1867/68
  • Tόμος 24, 1868/69*
  • Tόμος 25, 1869/70
• Περίοδος τρίτη (Prakt 26-74)
  • Tόμος 26, 1870/71*
  • Tόμος 27, 1871/72
  • Tόμος 28, 1872/73 (Google*)
  • Tόμος 29, 1873/74
  • Tόμος 30, 1874/75
  • Tόμος 31, 1876
  • Tόμος 32, 1877
  • Tόμος 33, 1878
  • Tόμος 34, 1879
  • Tόμος 35, 1880
  • Tόμος 36, 1881
  • Tόμος 37, 1882*
  • Tόμος 38, 1883*
  • Tόμος 39, 1884*
  • Tόμος 40, 1885*
  • Tόμος 41, 1886*
  • Tόμος 42, 1887*
  • Tόμος 43, 1888
  • Tόμος 44, 1889
  • Tόμος 45, 1890*
  • Tόμος 46, 1891
  • Tόμος 47, 1892
  • Tόμος 48, 1893
  • Tόμος 49, 1894*
  • Tόμος 50, 1895*
  • Tόμος 51, 1896 (Google*)
  • Tόμος 52, 1897*
  • Tόμος 53, 1898*
  • Tόμος 54, 1899*
  • Tόμος 55, 1900*
  • Tόμος 56, 1901*
  • Tόμος 57, 1902*
  • Tόμος 58, 1903*
  • Tόμος 59, 1904*
  • Tόμος 60, 1905*
  • Tόμος 61, 1906*
  • Tόμος 62, 1907*
  • Tόμος 63, 1908*
  • Tόμος 64, 1909*
  • Tόμος 65, 1910*
  • Tόμος 66, 1911
  • Tόμος 67, 1912
  • Tόμος 68, 1913
  • Tόμος 69, 1914
  • Tόμος 70, 1915
  • Tόμος 71-74, 1916/19
• Περίοδος τέταρτη (Prakt 75-141)
  • Tόμος 75, 1920
  • Tόμος 76, 1921
  • Tόμος 77-79, 1922/24
  • Tόμος 80-81, 1925/26
  • Tόμος 82, 1927
  • Tόμος 83, 1928
  • Tόμος 84, 1929
  • Tόμος 85, 1930
  • Tόμος 86, 1931
  • Tόμος 87, 1932
  • Tόμος 88, 1933
  • Tόμος 89, 1934
  • Tόμος 90, 1935
  • Tόμος 91, 1936
  • Tόμος 92, 1937
  • Tόμος 93, 1938
  • Tόμος 94, 1939
  • Tόμος 95, 1940
  • Tόμος 96-99, 1941-1944
  • Tόμος 100-103, 1945-1948
  • Tόμος 104, 1949
  • Tόμος 105, 1950
  • Tόμος 106, 1951
  • Tόμος 107, 1952
  • Tόμος 108, 1953
  • Tόμος 109, 1954
  • Tόμος 110, 1955
  • Tόμος 111, 1956
  • Tόμος 112, 1957
  • Tόμος 113, 1958
  • Tόμος 114, 1959
  • Tόμος 115, 1960
  • Tόμος 116, 1961
  • Tόμος 117, 1962
  • Tόμος 118, 1963
  • Tόμος 119, 1964
  • Tόμος 120, 1965
  • Tόμος 121, 1966
  • Tόμος 122, 1967
  • Tόμος 123, 1968
  • Tόμος 124, 1969
  • Tόμος 125, 1970
  • Tόμος 126, 1971
  • Tόμος 127, 1972
  • Tόμος 128, 1973
  • Tόμος 129, 1974
  • Tόμος 130, 1975, τεύχη A-B
  • Tόμος 131, 1976, τεύχη A-B
  • Tόμος 132, 1977, τεύχη A-B
  • Tόμος 133, 1978
  • Tόμος 134, 1979
  • Tόμος 135, 1980
  • Tόμος 136, 1981, τεύχη A-B
  • Tόμος 137, 1982
  • Tόμος 138, 1983, τεύχη A-B
  • Tόμος 139, 1984, τεύχη A-B
  • Tόμος 140, 1985
  • Tόμος 141, 1986
• Περίοδος πέμπτη (Prakt 142-157)
  • Tόμος 142, 1987
  • Tόμος 143, 1988
  • Tόμος 144, 1989
  • Tόμος 145, 1990
  • Tόμος 146, 1991
  • Tόμος 147, 1992
  • Tόμος 148, 1993
  • Tόμος 149, 1994
  • Tόμος 150, 1995
  • Tόμος 151, 1996
  • Tόμος 152, 1997
  • Tόμος 153, 1998
  • Tόμος 154, 1999
  • Tόμος 155, 2000
  • Tόμος 156, 2001
  • Tόμος 157, 2002
  • Τόμος 158, 2003
  • Τόμος 159, 2004
  • Τόμος 160, 2005
  • Τόμος 161, 2006
  • Τόμος 162, 2007
  • Τόμος 163, 2008

Thursday, 14 July 2011

Deltion tēs Christianikēs Archaiologikēs Hetaireias

Δελτίον της Χριστιανικής Αρχαιολογικής Εταιρείας, Αθήνα - Deltion tēs Christianikēs Archaiologikēs Hetaireias -Deltion of the Christian Archaeological Society, Athens.





Full Achice available at the ChAE.


Series 1

1. 1884-1891 (Google*) (Google*) (Google*) (Google*) (ChAE)
2. 1882-1894 (Google*) (ChAE)
3. 1894-1902 [1903] (Google*) (Google*) (Google*) (ChAE)
4. 1904 (Google*) (ChAE)
5. 1905 (Google*)
(ChAE)
6. 1906 (Google*) (Google*) (ChAE1/2, ChAE 2/2)
7. 1906 (ChAE)
8. 1908-1909 (Google*) (ChAE)
9. 1910 (ChAE
10. 1911 (ChAE)

Series 2

11. 1924 (1&2) (ChAE)
11. 1924 (3&4) (ChAE)
2 [12]. 1925 (1&2) (ChAE)

3 [13]. 1926 (ChAE)
4 [14]. 1927 (ChAE)

Series 3

1 [15]. 1932 (ChAE)
2 [16]. 1933 Festschrift Antonios Benakis(ChAE)

Archaiologiko Deltio (AD)

Αρχαιολογικό Δελτίο - Archaiologiko Deltio (AD).






E (1889) (AM-issuu)



2 (1916) (Google*)
3 (1917)
4 (1918)
5 (1919)
6 (1920-21)
7 (1921-22)
8 (1923)
9 (1924-25)
10 (1926)
11 (1927-28)
12 (1929)
13 (1930-31)
14 (1932-33)
15 (1933-35)
16 (1960)
17 (1961-62)
18 (1963)
19 (1964)
20 (1965)
21 (1966)
22 (1967)
23 (1968)
24 (1969)
25 (1970)
26 (1971)
27 (1972)
28 (1973)
29 (1974)
30 (1975)
31 (1976)
32 (1977)
33 (1978)
34 (1979)
35 (1980)
36 (1989)

Archaiologiké Ephimeris (AE)

Αρχαιολογική Εφημερίς - Archéologiké Ephimeris (AE)Pubished by the Archaeological Socety - Αρχαιολογκή Εταιρεία1837-Present.


Index by volume:

Index 1837-1874 (I.A.)
vols 127-145 (1988-2006) (ArchEtaireia)

Πρώτη Περίοδος
(1837-1860)

1 (1837) (Heidelberg)
2 (1838) (Heidelberg)
3 (1839) (Heidelberg)
4 (1840) (Heidelberg)
5 (1841) (Heidelberg)
6 (1842) (Heidelberg)
7 (1843) (Heidelberg)
8 (1852) (Heidelberg)
9 (1853) (Heidelberg)
10 (1854) (Heidelberg)
11 (1855) (Heidelberg)
12 (1856) (Heidelberg)
13 (1857) (Heidelberg)
14 (1858) (Heidelberg)
15 (1859) (Heidelberg)
16 (1860) (Heidelberg)

Δεύτερη Περίοδος (1862-1874)

17 [12] (1862) (Google*)(Google*) (Google) (Heidelberg)
18 [13] (1869) (Google*) (Heidelberg)
19 [14] (1870) (Heidelberg)
20 [15] (1872) (Heidelberg)
[16] (1873) (Heidelberg)
21 [17] (1874) (Heidelberg)

Τρίτη Περίοδος (1883-1923)

22 (1883) [1884] (Google*) (I.A.) (Heidelberg)
23 (1884) [1885] (Heidelberg)
24 (1885) (Google*) (I.A.) (Heidelberg)
25 (1886) (Heidelberg)
26 (1887) (Heidelberg)
27 (1888) (Heidelberg)
28 (1889) (Heidelberg)
29 (1890) [1891] (I.A.) (Heidelberg)
30 (1891) (Heidelberg)
31 (1892) (Heidelberg)
32 (1893) (Heidelberg)
33 (1894) (Heidelberg)
34 (1895) (Heidelberg)
35 (1896) [1897] (I.A.) (Heidelberg)
36 (1897) (Heidelberg)
37 (1898) (Google*) (Heidelberg)
38 (1899) (Google*) (Google*) (Heidelberg)
39 (1900) (I.A.) (Heidelberg)
40 (1901) (Google*)
41 (1902) (Heidelberg)
42 (1903) [1904] (I.A.) (Heidelberg)
43 (1904) (Google*) (Heidelberg)
44 (1905) (Google*)
45 (1906) (Heidelberg)
46 (1907) (Google*) (Heidelberg)
47 (1908) (Heidelberg)
48 (1909) (Heidelberg)
49 (1910) (Heidelberg)
50 1911 (Heidelberg)
51 (1912) (Heidelberg)
52 (1913) (Heidelberg)
53 (1914) (Heidelberg)
54 (1915) (Heidelberg)
55 (1916) (Heidelberg)
56 (1917) (Heidelberg)
57 (1918) (Heidelberg)
58  (1919) (Heidelberg)
59 (1920) (Heidelberg)
60 (1921) (Heidelberg)
61 (1922) (Heidelberg)
62 (1923) (Heidelberg)

Τέταρτη Περίοδος (1924-1986)

63 (1924) (Heidelberg)
64/65 (1925/26) (Heidelberg)
66/67 (1927/28)
68 (1929)
69 (1930)
70 (1931)
71 (1932)
72 (1933)
73/74 (1934/35)
75 (1936)
76 (1937)
77 (1938)
78-80 (1939-41)
81-83 (1942-44)
84-86 (1945-47)
87/88 (1948/49)
89/90 (1950/51)
91
92
93
94 (1955)
95 (1956)
96
97
98
99 (1960)
100
101
102
103
104 (1965)
105
106
107
108
109 (1970)
110 (1971)
111 (1972)
112 (1973)
113 (1974)
114 (1975)
115 (1976)
116 (1977)
117 (1978)
118 (1979)
119 (1980)
120 (1981)
121 (1982)
122 (1983)
123 (1984)
124 (1985)
125 (1986)

Πέμπτη Περίοδος (1987-)

126 (1987)
127 (1988)
128 (1989)
129 (1990)
130 (1991)
131 (1992)
132 (1993)
133 (1994)
134 (1995)
135 (1996)
136 (1997)
137 (1998)
138 (1999)
139 (2000)
140 (2001)
141 (2002)
142 (2003)
143 (2004)
144 (2005)
145 (2006)
146 (2007)
147 (2008)
148 (2009)
149 (2010)

Tuesday, 12 July 2011

Greek Abreviations (Publishing)

Greek Abreviations (Publishing) - Ελληνικές Εκδοτικές Συντομογραφίες



Συντομογραφία
Ελληνικά
English Abbr.
English
α/ααύξων αριθμός

α.α.
αντ'αυτού

αρ.
αριθμόςnumber

βλ.βλέπεsee

βλ. λ.
βλέπε λήμμα


δ.
δεσποινίς-ίδες


δίδα
δεσποινίς

δίδες
δεσποινίδες


δ/νση
διεύθυνση


έ.α.
ένθα ανωτέρω


έκ.
έκδοση
ed.
edition
κ.
κύριος-α


κ.
κοινώς


κα
κυρία


κ.α.
και αλλού


κ.ά.
και άλλα


κ.ε.
και εξής


κ. εξ.
και εξής


κ. επ.
και επέκεινα


κκ.
κύριοι ή κυρίες


κ.λπ
και λοιποί


κ.λ.π.
και λοιπά


κ.λπ.
και λοιπά

κλπ.
και λοιπά

κ.ο.κ.
και ούτω καθεξής


λ.
λέξη, λήμμα


λεξ.
λεξη, λέξεις


ξ.λ.
ξένη/ξενική λέξη


ό.π.
όπως παραπάνω


όπ.π.
όπως παραπάνω/
όπως προαναφέρθηκε


όπ. παρ.
όπου παραπάνω/
όπως παρακάτω


πίν.
πίνακας
pl.
plate
πρβ.
παράβαλε

compare
πρβλ.
παράβαλε
compare
πρκτ.
παρακάτω
infra

π.χ.
παραδείγματος χάριν

σ.
σελίδα
p.
page
σσ.
σελίδες
pp.
pages
ΥΓ
υστερόγραφο
PS
Post scriptum
φ.
φύλλο


φάκ.
φάκελος


χφ.
χειρόγραφο
ms.
manuscript
















































































































Journal des Savants

Journal des Savants

INDEXES:
1816-1858 (PDF) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1859-1908 (PDF) (I.A.)

1665-1792

1665
1666
1667
1668
1669
1670
1671
1672
1673
1674
1675
1676
1677
1678
1679
1680
1681
1682
1683
1684
1685 (Hathi)

1686 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1687 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1688 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1689 (Jan.-Apr) (Hathi)
1689 (May-Dec.) (Hathi)
1690 (Jan. May) (Hathi)
1690 (Jun.-Dec.) (Hathi)
1691 (Jan.-Jun.) (Hathi)
1691 (Jul.-Dec.) (Hathi)
1692
1693 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1694 (Hathi)
1695 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1696 (Hathi)
1697 (Hathi)
1698 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1699
1700
1701 (I.A.)
1702 (I.A.)
1702 (Aug-Dec) (Hathi)
1702 (Jan-May) (Hathi)
1702 (May-Jul) (Hathi)
1703 (I.A.)
1703 (Jan-Jun) (Hathi)
1704 (I.A.)
1704 (Aug-Dec) (Hathi)
1704 (Jan-Apr) (Hathi)
1704 (May-Aug) (Hathi) (I.A.)
1705 (I.A.)
1706
1707 (Google) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1708 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1709 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1710
(Hathi) (I.A.)
1711 (I.A.) (I.A.)
1712 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1713 (I.A.) (I.A.)
1714 (I.A.) (I.A.)
1715
(Hathi)
1716 (Hathi)
1717
1718 (Hathi)
1719 (I.A.)
1720
(Hathi)
1721 (Hathi)
1722 (I.A.) (I.A.)
1723 (I.A.)
1724 (I.A.)
1725 (I.A.) (I.A.)
1726
1727 (I.A.) (I.A.)
1727 Apr-Jun
(Hathi) (I.A.)
1727 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1727 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1727 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1728 (I.A.) (I.A.)
Link1728 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1728 Jan (Hathi)
1728 May-Aug (Hathi)
1728 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1729 (Google) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1729 Apr-Jun
(Hathi)
1729 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1729 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1729 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1730
1731
1732
1733 (I.A.)
1733 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1733 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1733 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1734 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1734 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1734 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1734 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1734 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1735
1736 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1736 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1736 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1736 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1736 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1737
1738
1739 (I.A.) (I.A.)
1739 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1739 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1739 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1739 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1740 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1740 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1740 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1740 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1740 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1741 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1741 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1741 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1741 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1741 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1742 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1742 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1742 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1742 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1742 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1743 (Hathi)
1744 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1744 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1744 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1744 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1744 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1745 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1745 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1745 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1745 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1745 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1746 (IA.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1746 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1746 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1746 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1746 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1747 (Hathi)
1748 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1748 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1748 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1748 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1748 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1749 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1749 Apr-Jun (Hathi)Link1749 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1749 Jun-Aug (Hathi)
1749 Sep-Nov (Hathi)
1749 Dec (Hathi)
1750 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1750 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1750 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1750 Jun-Aug (Hathi)
1750 Sep-Nov (Hathi)
1750 Dec (Hathi)
1751 (Hathi)
1752 (Hathi)
1753 (Hathi)
1754 (Hathi)
1755 (Hathi)
1756 (Hathi)
1757 (Hathi)
1758 (Hathi)
1759
1760
(Hathi) (Google)
1761
1762 (Hathi)
1763 (Hathi)
1764
1765
1766
1767
1768
1769
1770
1771
1772
1773
1774
1775
1776
1777
1778 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
Link1778 May-Jun (Hathi)
1778 Jul-Sep (Hathi)Link1778 Oct-Nov (Hathi)
1778 Dec (Hathi)
1779 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1779 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1779 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1779 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1779 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1780 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1780 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1780 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1780 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1780 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1781 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1781 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1781 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1781 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1781 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1782 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1782 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1782 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1782 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1782 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1783 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1783 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1783 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
Link1783 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1783 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1784
1785
1786 Apr-Jun (Hathi)
1786 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1786 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1786 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1786 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1787 (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1787 Apr-Jun (Haithi)
1787 Jan-Mar (Hathi)
1787 Jul-Sep (Hathi)
1787 Oct-Dec (Hathi)
1788
1789
1790
1791
1792
Link
1816-1900

1816 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1817 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1818 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1819 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1820 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1821 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1822 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1823 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1824 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1825 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1826 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1827 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1828 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1829 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1830 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1831 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1832 (Hathi)
1833 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1834 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1835 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1836 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1837 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1838 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1839 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1840 (Hathi)
1841 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1842 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1843 (Google) (Haithi) (I.A.)
1844 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1845 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1846 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1847 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1848 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1849 (Hathi)
1850 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1851 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1852 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1853 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1854 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1855 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1856 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1857 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1858 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1859 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1860 (Hathi) (I.A.)Link1861 (Hathi)
1862 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1863 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1864 (Hathi)
1865 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1866 (Hathi) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1867 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1868 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1869 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1870 (Hathi) (I.A.)
1871 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1872 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1873 (Hath*) (I.A.)
1874 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1875 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1876 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1877 (Hathi*) (Google*) (I.A.)
1878 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1879 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1880 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1881 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1882 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1883 (I.A.)
1884 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1885 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1886 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1887 (Hathi*) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1888 (I.A.)
1889 (I.A.)
1890 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1891 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1892 (I.A.)
1893 (Hathi*) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1894 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1895 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1896 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1897 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1898 (Hathi*) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1899 (Hathi*) (I.A.) (I.A.)
1900 (Hathi*) (I.A.)

1901-1908 (Institut de France)


1901 (Hathi*) (I.A.)
1902 (Hathi*) (I.A.)

Nouvelle Série

1 (1903) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
2 (1904) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
3 (1905) (Hathi*) (I.A.) (I.A.)
4 (1906) (Hathi*) (I.A.) (I.A.)
5 (1907) (Hathi*) (I.A.) (I.A.)
6 (1908) (Hathi*) (Google*) (I.A.)
7 (1909) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
8 (1910) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
9 (1911) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
10 (1912) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
11 (1913)
12 (1914) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
13 (1915) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
14 (1916) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
15 (1917) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
16 (1918) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
17 (1919) (Hathi*) (I.A.)
18 (1920) (Hathi*)
19 (1921) (Hathi*) (I.A.)

1925-present (Academie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres)

From (Persée)
1960 : [ 1 (Jan-Mar) ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1961 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1962 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1963 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1964 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1965 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1966 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1967 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1968 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1969 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1970 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1971 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1972 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1973 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1974 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1975 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1976 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1977 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1978 : [ 1-2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1979 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1980 : [ 1-2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1981 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]
1982 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1983 : [ 1-3 ] [ 4 ]
1984 : [ 1-2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1985 : [ 1-3 ] [ 4 ]
1986 : [ 1-3 ] [ 4 ]
1987 : [ 1-2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1988 : [ 1-2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1989 : [ 1-2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1990 : [ 1-2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1991 : [ 1-2 ] [ 3-4 ]
1992 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
1993 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
1994 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
1995 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
1996 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
1997 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
1998 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
1999 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
2000 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
2001 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
2002 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
2003 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
2004 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
2005 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]
2006 : [ 1 ] [ 2 ]